Desserts

From classic crumble to exotic mango compote, you'll find ideas to finish your Sunday lunch in style.

Rhubarb and pear crumble
Homemade custard
Cornish clotted cream panna cotta with poached fruits by Rodda's
Warm mango compote with basil and vanilla ice cream by Ken Hom
Tea poached pears by Tregothnan
Chocolate orange pots by Rodda's
English Trifle with sugared nuts by Galton Blackiston
Bread and Butter Pudding by Paul Heathcote
Treacle Tart by Shaun Rankin
Custard pancakes
Lemon curd and Earl Grey cake by Tregothnan

 

Rhubarb and pear crumble

Pudding always tastes better when it's made with wholesome British fruits. And, preferably, covered in custard. This rhubarb and pear crumble will send your guests home with their sweet tooth more than satisfied.

Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

25 g butter
3 ripe pears, cored and halved
600 g rhubarb, cut into chunks
100 g golden caster sugar
½ tsp ground cinnamon
Finely grated zest and juice of one orange

For the crumble topping

200 g cold butter, diced
200 g self-raising flour
50 g porridge oats
140 g Demerara sugar

Method

1. Pre-heat the oven to 180°C, gas mark 6.
2. Add all the topping ingredients together in a bowl. Rub together with your fingers until it forms a rough mixture, then set aside in the fridge.
3. Add the pears, rhubarb, sugar and cinnamon to melted butter and cook over a low heat for about 10 minutes, until the fruit is tender.
4. Pour the fruit mixture into a greased ovenproof dish and mix with the sugar and orange juice and zest.
5. Sprinkle the topping over the fruit filling. Bake for 30 minutes or until golden brown on top.

Homemade custard

Custard comes in many forms. For pouring over desserts, we think a milk-based custard tastes best.

Prep time: 5 minutes
Cooking time: 15 minutes

Ingredients

600 ml whole milk
6 large egg yolks
2 tbsp caster sugar
1 vanilla pod, split and seeds scraped out, or a drop of vanilla extract
1 tsp flour

Method

1. Heat the milk at a low heat with the vanilla pods and seeds/or extract. Continue to heat until it is gently simmering but be careful not to boil.
2. Beat the egg yolks in a bowl with flour and caster sugar until you have a smooth mixture.
3. Pour the hot milk over the egg mixture and whisk until combined.
4. Slowly add the mixture back to the milk pan and heat gently. The custard is ready when it coats the back of the spoon.

Top tip

A spoonful of corn flour can help stop your custard curdling, and will give a smooth texture. Also, if you're serving something for your Great British dessert which requires thicker custard, like a trifle, you can substitute cream for milk in the below recipe. Single or double works just as well, depending on how thick and rich you want your custard.

Cornish clotted cream panna cotta with poached fruits by Rodda's

Cornish clotted cream panna cotta with poached fruits by Rodda's

Beautifully creamy and silky smooth, this is one of those simple yet impressive dinner party desserts that you'll want to make again and again.

Preparation time: 5 minutes plus 4 hours setting time

Serves 6

Ingredients

125 ml semi-skimmed milk
1 vanilla pod, split and seeds scraped
60 g caster sugar
450 g Rodda's Cornish clotted cream
6 g gelatine leaves
500 g caster sugar
1 cinnamon stick
1 star anise
500 g plums, cut in half and stoned

Method

1. Heat the milk in a pan over a low-medium heat. Add the vanilla seeds and pod to the milk. Add the sugar and bring to a simmer, stirring to dissolve the sugar and disperse the vanilla seeds.
2. Gently beat the Rodda's Cornish clotted cream until smooth, incorporating the crust, then add to the milk, stirring till smooth. Remove the pan from the heat.
3. Soak the gelatine leaves in cold water till soft (approximately 30 seconds). Squeeze the excess water from the soaked gelatine, add to the milk mixture to dissolve, then allow the mixture to cool.
4. Divide the mixture into dariole moulds and leave to set in the fridge for 4 hours, or overnight.
5. For the poached fruits, put the sugar, cinnamon and star anise in the pan with 1 litre water and bring to a simmer, stirring to dissolve the sugar.
6. Add the halved plums. The cooking time depends on how ripe the plums are. If they're very ripe simply put them in the hot syrup and remove from the heat to infuse. If the plums are hard and unripe, pop them into the syrup and simmer on a low heat for 5-10 minutes until tender. Leave to cool in the syrup.

Chef's tip

This syrup can be modified to suit the season or the fruit used e.g. replace the cinnamon and star anise with a sprig of rosemary and a split vanilla pod for peaches or apricots.

Visit Rodda’s website for more recipe ideas.

Warm mango compote with basil and vanilla ice cream by Ken Hom

Warm mango compote with basil and vanilla ice cream by Ken Hom

This is a simple dessert that I have often made for my food promotions at The Oriental in Bangkok. Mangoes are popular and abundant in Thailand.

Their rich, fleshly and satin-like texture transforms this recipe into an exquisite finale. Vanilla ice cream found in supermarkets is of high quality and is of great convenience.

The combination of the cold and warm fruit is unbeatable.

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 vanilla bean, split in half
110 g (4 oz) sugar
150 ml (5 floz) water
750 g (1½ lb) - 2 medium mangoes
tiny pinch of salt
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
6 basil leaves, coarsely chopped
Supermarket vanilla ice cream

Method

1. Scrape the inside seeds of the vanilla bean into the sugar and mix well. Using a non-stick wok or pan, bring the sugar and water to a boil, add the vanilla bean and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove the vanilla bean, dry it thoroughly and save for future use by storing it in sugar. Peel the mangoes and cut the fruit into ¼ in thick slices.
2. Add the mangoes and salt and simmer for 2 minutes, just enough to warm and not to cook through. Remove from the heat, stir in the butter and the basil, stir gently and serve at once with scoops of vanilla ice cream.

Tea poached pears by Tregothnan

Serves 2-4

Ingredients

4 firm pears
50 g caster sugar
1 tbsp clear Tregothnan Estate honey
1 tbsp cranberry jelly
2 Tregothnan Earl Grey tea bags
100 g crumbled blue cheese
50 g walnuts
Handful of baby kale or watercress
Handful of fresh cranberries

Method

1. Place the honey, sugar, Earl Grey tea, cranberry jelly and 600 ml of water into a sauce pan and bring to the boil. Then add in the peeled, cored and halved pears. Cover and simmer for 15 minutes or until the pears are tender.
2. Remove the poached pears ready to plate and discard the tea bags. Add in a handful of fresh cranberries to the poaching liquor and reduce the tea syrup down for a further 4-5 minutes until syrupy consistency - try using redcurrants or sultanas if cranberries aren’t available.
3. Serve the the tea poached pear with walnuts, blue cheese and a green salad. Garnish with a drizzle of tea syrup and the fresh berries.

Recipe courtesy of Tregothnan.

Chocolate orange pots by Rodda's

Chocolate orange pots by Rodda's

Velvety smooth and deliciously tangy, these Chocolate Orange Pots will be a delicious addition to any dinner party or just as a decadent treat.

The Cornish clotted cream will finish them off perfectly.

Preparation time: 15 minutes plus setting time

Serves 4

200 g plain chocolate, broken into small pieces
Zest of 1 orange + 2 tbsp juice
227 g tub Cornish Clotted Cream
25 g farmhouse butter

Method

1. Place all the ingredients in a large bowl and place over a pan of simmering water, then allow to melt gently.
2. When melted, stir well and transfer to 4 x 150 ml ramekin dishes or glasses and allow to set in the fridge for a couple of hours or overnight.
3. Just before serving, top with a spoonful of Cornish clotted cream.

Visit Rodda’s website for more recipe ideas.

Lemon curd and Earl Grey cake by Tregothnan

Ingredients

Earl Grey cake

3 duck eggs or 5 chicken eggs
250 g self raising flour
250 g unsalted butter
250 g caster sugar
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp loose Tregothnan Earl Grey tea leaves
2 tbsp lemon juice and zest of lemon
1 tsp vanilla

Earl Grey syrup

1 cup of water
1 Tregothnan Earl Grey tea bag
1 cup of caster sugar
1/2 tsp vanilla

Icing

100 g cream cheese
50 g lemon curd
50 g icing sugar

Method

1. Preheat your oven to 160˚C and line the base of two round tins with baking parchment, greasing with a little butter or oil. Cream the butter and sugar together with a whisk for 3 minutes until light and fluffy. Then add the eggs and vanilla whisking gradually together. Finish with Lemon zest and juice. Sift in the flour and baking powder from a height to get in extra air.
2. Fold in the Earl Grey tea (crush it in a pestle and mortar first to keep it fine, then fold everything in until a smooth cake batter consistency.
3. Divide the batter into your two tins and smooth over. Bake in the oven for 25 minutes and cool in the tin.
4. Whilst the cakes are cooling make a simple Earl Grey syrup by boiling the water tea and sugar until it reduces. Then add the vanilla and allow to cool. Poke holes in the cake and drizzle your Earl Grey Syrup into them.
5. Make your Lemon Curd icing by sifting icing sugar into your cream cheese and folding in the lemon curd. Layer your cake with lemon curd icing and garnish with edible flowers. Serve a generous slice with a cup of Earl Grey.

Recipe courtesy of Tregothnan.

English Trifle with sugared nuts by Galton Blackiston

English Trifle

Galton Blackiston shares a delightful English trifle recipe. Serious foodies have big debates over what should and shouldn't be included in a trifle; jelly is actually a comparatively modern addition and purists would have none of it.

But with a dessert as good as this, with its rosé and raspberry jelly, even those jelly doubters will be swayed.

Serves 2

Cooking time: 2 hours plus overnight chilling

Ingredients

Trifle sponge
3 medium free-range eggs
440 g of caster sugar
75 g of self-raising flour
3 tbsp of cornflour
40 g of unsalted butter, melted and slightly cooled (plus extra for greasing)
Rose raspberry jelly
900 g of raspberries, hulled
4 gelatine leaves
500 ml of sparkling rosé wine

English custard
725 ml of whipping cream
150 ml of full-fat milk
1 vanilla pod, split lengthways
4 medium free-range egg yolks
100 g of caster sugar
2 tbsp of cornflour
Raspberry sorbet
450 g of raspberries
1/2 lemon, juice only

Sugar syrup
250 g of caster sugar
350 ml of sparkling rosé wine
Sugared nuts
25 g of pine nuts
25 g of whole almonds, skins removed
25 g of whole hazelnuts, skins removed
25 g of pecan nuts, chopped
100 g of icing sugar, sifted
4 tbsp of Grand Marnier
Oil

To plate
5 tbsp of Marsala wine
1/2 small jar of raspberry jam
425 ml of whipping cream

Method

1. Start off by making the sugar syrup. You will need this for the rosé and raspberry jelly and the raspberry sorbet. Put the sugar and wine into a saucepan and heat to dissolve the sugar, then simmer gently for two minutes. Remove from the heat and allow to cool.
2. To make the jelly, soften the gelatine leaves in a small bowl of cold water for five minutes. While they are softening, place the raspberries and 150ml of the sugar syrup in a saucepan and slowly bring to the boil. Gently poach the fruit until very soft. Pass the mixture through a piece of muslin or jelly bag into a jug.
3. Remove the softened gelatine leaves, squeezing out any excess water, and then stir into the still hot raspberries and sugar syrup. Cool at room temperature in the jug until just beginning to set.
4. Very slowly and gently, stir in the Masala wine retaining as many bubbles as possible. Try not to stir and pour too quickly, otherwise the mixture will get very frothy. Chill for 3-4 hours or overnight until set.
5. Preheat the oven to 180°C/Gas mark 4. Grease a deep, 20cm/8in round cake tin and line the bottom with baking parchment.
6. To make the sponge, put the sugar and eggs into a large heatproof mixing bowl set over a pan of hot water and beat with an electric mixer until pale and creamy.
7. You want the mixture to increase in volume considerably and become thick enough to leave a trail on the surface when the beaters are lifted out. Remove the bowl from the pan and continue to whisk until the mixture is cold.
8. Sift together the self-raising flour with the cornflour. Sift half of it onto the surface of the egg mixture and fold in gently with a metal spoon. Carefully pour half the cooled butter around the edge of the mixture and lightly fold in. Sift over the remaining sifted flour mix and fold in, alternating with the remaining butter.
9. Pour into the prepared tin and bake for 20-30 minutes or until the sponge is firm to the touch, well risen and beginning to shrink away from the sides of the tin. Allow to cool in the tin for a few minutes before turning out onto a wire rack. Leave to cool completely.
10. While the sponge is baking, start making your sorbet. Blend the raspberries in a food processor, then press the purée through a fine sieve to remove the pips. Stir in 150ml of the sugar syrup and the lemon juice and churn in an ice cream machine until softly set, then transfer to a container and freeze.
11. To make the sugared nuts, place the almonds, hazelnuts, pine nuts, pecan nuts, icing sugar and Grand Marnier in a large, heavy-based, non-stick frying pan.
12. Heat gently on the lowest possible heat, giving the occasional stir. Be very careful once the sugar starts to caramelise that it doesn't burn. Turn the mixture onto a very lightly oiled tray and allow to cool.
13. To make the custard, pour the cream and milk into a heavy-based saucepan. Scrape in the seeds out of the vanilla pod and add the empty pod too. Bring slowly to the boil; then set aside to infuse.
14. In a large bowl whisk the egg yolks, sugar and cornflour together. Gently reheat the milk and cream mixture. As soon as it reaches boiling point, pour it onto the egg yolk mixture, making sure you are whisking all the time.
15. Pour back into the saucepan and stir over a low heat. You need the custard to thicken enough to coat the back of the spoon. Immediately remove the pan from the heat and pass the custard through a fine sieve into a clean bowl. Allow to cool and thicken.
16. To assemble the trifle, break up the sponge into pieces and place in the bottom of a large decorative bowl, or divide among individual glasses. Douse with the Marsala wine, then spread over the raspberry jam and leave to soak.
17. Carefully break up the raspberry and rosé jelly with a whisk or fork, and spoon it over the soaked sponge. Pour over the custard. Whip the whipping cream to a soft peak stage and spread this over the top of the custard.
18. Roughly chop the sugared nuts and sprinkle them over the whipped cream. Keep chilled, and serve with the raspberry sorbet.

Recipe courtesy of Great British Chefs. Visit for more trifle recipes.

Bread and Butter Pudding by Paul Heathcote

Bread and butter pudding

There's nothing quite like warm bread and butter pudding to round off a Sunday lunch.

This is a brilliant bread and butter pudding recipe, with easy to source ingredients (if you don't already have them in your store cupboard.)

Paul Heathcote's cooking has always been famed for celebrating abandoned dishes, and this classic is certainly worth revitalising. Serve it with clotted cream, as suggested here, or a large scoop of ice cream.

Serves 4

Cooking time: 1 hour

Ingredients

5 slices of white bread
75 g of unsalted butter
100 g of sultanas
220 ml of double cream
220 ml of milk
50 g of caster sugar
1 vanilla pod
3 eggs
25 g of icing sugar 50 g of apricot jam

To serve

50 g of clotted cream

Method

1. Begin your bread and butter pudding by removing the crusts and then applying butter to the bread.
2. Lay a layer of bread on the base of the tray and cover with a layer of sultanas.
3. Lay another layer of bread on top of the sultanas.
4. Combine the double cream, milk and sugar together in a pan. Split the vanilla pod and scrape out the seeds into the mixture and bring to the boil. Place the eggs in a separate bowl and beat the hot liquid into them.
5. Pour the egg mixture over the bread and place the dish in a bain-marie and cook in an oven with medium heat for 30 minutes until cooked.
6. Sprinkle the cooked bread and butter pudding with icing sugar and glaze until golden.
7. Spread the bread and butter pudding thickly with apricot jam and serve with clotted cream and a compote of dried apricots.

Recipe courtesy of Great British Chefs. Visit for more bread and butter pudding recipes .

Treacle Tart by Shaun Rankin

Treacle Tart

Bring back some childhood memories with the much-loved British classic – Treacle Tart. It's a fabulous dessert fit for many occasions. Whether it's served at a family Sunday lunch or a dinner party with friends, it's bound to be a winner.

Serves 6

Cooking time: 1 hour 30 minutes plus cooling

Ingredients

Treacle Tart pastry
260 g of plain flour
100 g of icing sugar
30 g of ground almonds
125g of unsalted butter, diced
3 eggs
1 tsp of milk
Plain flour for dusting

Treacle Tart filling
60g of unsalted butter
1 egg
1 egg yolk
3 tbsp of double cream
6 g of salt
450 g of golden syrup
120 g of brown bread crumbs

To plate
250 g of raspberries
1/2 lemon, juiced
1 tsp of icing sugar
black pepper
225 g of clotted cream

Method

1. To make the pastry, use your fingertips to mix together the flour, sugar, almonds and butter in a large bowl. Mix until you get a crumbly consistency.
2. Add two eggs to the bowl and mix thoroughly. Cover the bowl with cling film and leave in the fridge for half an hour. In the meantime, preheat the oven to 180ºC/Gas mark 4.
3. Lightly dust a clean work surface with flour and roll out your pastry to 2mm thick. Line the tart ring with the pastry, hanging over the sides. Cover the tart base with ovenproof cling film and fill it with baking beans or dry rice.
4. Pierce the pastry with a fork and bake for about 20 minutes, till the case is cooked and slightly golden. Remove the baking beans and cling film.
5. In a small bowl, mix together the milk and egg. Use a pastry brush and brush the egg wash over the tart. Return to the oven and bake for another 3 minutes. Remove from the oven and reduce the temperature to 160ºC/Gas mark 3.
6. To make the treacle filling, melt the butter in a saucepan till it foams and turns brown. Then remove from heat. Pour the butter through a sieve and into a bowl to remove any unwanted sediment.
7. Mix the egg, egg yolk, cream and salt in a bowl.
8. In a separate saucepan, gently heat the golden syrup for a couple minutes until hot. Pour in the brown butter and stir until it goes cloudy. Next, add the cream mixture. Add the breadcrumbs and mix well. Finally, pour into the cooked tart base.
9. Bake in the oven for 25 minutes, then reduce the temperature to 140ºC/Gas mark 1 and cook for another 20 minutes.
10. Remove from oven and leave to rest. The base should be crunchy, whilst top should be chewy and the middle should be soft and moist.
11. To serve, mix the raspberries, lemon juice and icing sugar in a bowl. Season with pepper. Slice the tart into equal portions, scatter with the raspberries and a dollop of clotted cream.

Recipe courtesy of Great British Chefs. Visit for more tart recipes.

Custard pancakes

Want something sweet to round off your Great British Sunday Lunch, but don't want to make another full-blown course? Make extra batter for your Yorkshire puddings and whip up some custard pancakes for dessert.

Ingredients

Yorkshire pudding batter
Spoonful of oil
1 egg, beaten
Home made/ready made custard
Knob of butter
150 g sugar
Glug of rum!

Method

1. Oil a 20 cm frying pan and pour in enough leftover batter to thinly cover the base of the pan. When the edges start turning golden, flip the pancake and cook on the other side for about 30 seconds. Keep going until you've got enough for everybody, or you've run out of batter.
2. Take a pancake, brush a little egg over the top and a tablespoon of custard to the centre. Roll the pancake up to half way to cover the custard, tuck in the sides and roll the rest up, but not too tightly.
3. Melt some butter in a non-stick frying pan and add your rolled up pancakes. Let them sizzle for about 30 seconds, flip over, sprinkle with sugar, then flip again. Repeat until the pancakes have puffed up and are lightly crusted with sugar.
4. Move the pancakes to a warm serving dish. Add a little more sugar to the pan, turn the heat up, add a touch more butter then a few generous glugs of rum. Let the mixture bubble then pour over the pancakes, and serve.